The Evolution of Rational-emotive Theory and Therapy
Sponsored by Missouri Western State University Sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation DUE-97-51113
Home |
The proper APA Style reference for this manuscript is:
SCHUETTPELZ, K.J. (1998). The Evolution of Rational-emotive Theory and Therapy. National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse, 1. Available online at http://www.webclearinghouse.net/volume/. Retrieved November 23, 2017 .

The Evolution of Rational-emotive Theory and Therapy
KITTY J. SCHUETTPELZ
Missouri Western State University PSYCHOLOGY

Sponsored by: Brian Cronk (cronk@missouriwestern.edu)
ABSTRACT
This review examines Albert Ellis’ theory of personality and the practice of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) which arises out of it. The philosophical and psychological antecedents of REBT are examined. Ellis propounds that humans have a biologically-based tendency toward both rational and irrational thinking. Irrational beliefs and absolutistic evaluations of self, others, and the environment lead to emotional disturbance. Deep philosophical change is proposed as the most effective treatment for psychopathology. It was found that outcome studies generally tend to support REBT’s psychotherapeutic effectiveness, but that the research is often flawed. The theory must be expanded and clarified to attain a more scientific status.

NOTE: This paper was written to satisfy a requirement for the course Psychology of Personality. The author thanks Dr. James Bargar for his support and encouragement to submit it for publication. The paper has been accepted for publication in the next issue (vol. 5) of the Journal of Psychological Inquiry.


REFERENCES
Bernard, M E., & DiGiuseppe, R. (1989). Rational-emotive therapy today. In M. E. Bernard & R. D. DiGiuseppe (Eds.), Inside rational-emotive therapy: A critical appraisal of the theory and therapy of Albert Ellis (pp. 1-7). San Diego: Academic Press, Inc.

Dryden, W. (1994). Books reconsidered: Reason and emotion in psychotherapy. British Journal of Psychiatry, 164, 131-135.

Ellis, A. (1987a, April). The impossibility of achieving consistently good mental health. American Psychologist, 364-375.

Ellis, A. (1987b). Religiosity and emotional disturbance: a reply to Sharkey and Malony. Psychotherapy, 24, 826-828.

Ellis, A. (1988). Can we legitimately evaluate ourselves? A reply to Robert C. Roberts. Psychotherapy, 25, 314-316.

Ellis, A. (1990a, June). Comment on ‘A competence paradigm for psychological practice.’ American Psychologist. 783-784.

Ellis, A. (1990b, June). Let’s not ignore individuality. American Psychologist, 781.

Ellis, A. (1995). Psychotherapy is alarmingly encumbered with disposable myths. Psychotherapy, 32, 495-499.

Ellis, A. (1996). How I learned to help clients feel better and get better. Psychotherapy, 33, 149-151.

Ellis, A., & Dryden, W. (1997a). Basic practice of REBT. In A. Ellis & W. Dryden (Eds.), The practice of rational-emotive behavior therapy (pp. 27-71). New York: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Ellis, A., & Dryden, W. (1997b). General theory of REBT. In A. Ellis & W. Dryden (Eds.), The practice of rational-emotive behavior therapy (pp. 1-26). New York: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Engler, B. (1995). Alfred Adler. Personality theories: an introduction. (4th ed., pp. 97-115). Boston: Houghton-Mifflin Company.

Flew, A. (Ed.). (1979). A dictionary of philosophy (2nd ed., rev.). New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Gateways’s Meditations of Marcus Aurelius and Epictetus’ Enchiridion. (1956). (G. Long, Trans.) South Bend, IN: Regnery-Gateway, Inc.

Gregg, G. (accessed Nov. 17, 1997). A sketch of Albert Ellis. [On-line]. Available: Albert Ellis Institute homepage, http://www.iret.org/ellis.html

Haaga, D. A. F., & Davison, G. C. (1993). An appraisal of rational-emotive therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61, 215-220.

Lyons, L. C., & Woods, P. J. (1991). The efficacy of rational-emotive therapy: a quantitative review of the outcome research. Clinical Psychology Review, 11, 357- 369.

Malony, H. N. (1987). Authors’ reply to ‘Religiosity and emotional disturbance: a reply to Sharkey and Malony.’ Psychotherapy, 24, 827-828.

McGinn, L. K. (1997). Interview: Albert Ellis on rational-emotive therapy. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 51, 309-316.

Reber, A. S. (1995). The Penguin dictionary of psychology (2nd ed.). Harmondsworth, England: Penguin Books, Ltd.

Roberts, R. C. (1987). Albert Ellis on evaluating selves. Psychotherapy, 24, 821-825.

Watson, C. G., Vassar, P., Plemel, D., Herder, J., & Manifold, V. (1990). A factor analysis of Ellis’ irrational beliefs. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 46, 412-415.

Wilson, G. L. (1993). Rational-emotive therapy. In Frank N. Magill (Ed.), Survey of Social Science, 5, (pp. 2052-2058). Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, Inc.

Woolfolk, R. L., & Sass, L. A., (1989). Philosophical foundations of rational-emotive therapy. In M. E. Bernard & R. D. DiGiuseppe (Eds.), Inside rational-emotive therapy: A critical appraisal of the theory and therapy of Albert Ellis (pp. 9-26). San Diego: Academic Press, Inc.

Ziegler, D. J. (1989). A critique of rational-emotive theory of personality. In M. E. Bernard & R. D. DiGiuseppe (Eds.), Inside rational-emotive therapy: A critical appraisal of the theory and therapy of Albert Ellis (pp. 27-45). San Diego: Academic Press, Inc.

Submitted 8/3/98 6:35:27 AM
Last Edited 9/14/2008 5:23:53 PM
Converted to New Site 03/09/2009

Rated by 0 users. Users who logon can rate manuscripts and write reviews.

© 2017 National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse. All rights reserved. The National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse is not responsible for the content posted on this site. If you discover material that violates copyright law, please notify the administrator. This site receives money through the Google AdSense program when users are directed to useful commercial sites. We do not encourage or condone clicking on the displayed ads unless you have a legitimate interest in the advertisement.