Effects of Music-elicited Emotion and Its Effect on Anterior Frontal Eeg
Sponsored by Missouri Western State University Sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation DUE-97-51113
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The proper APA Style reference for this manuscript is:
ORTMAN, W. J. (1999). Effects of Music-elicited Emotion and Its Effect on Anterior Frontal Eeg. National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse, 2. Available online at http://www.webclearinghouse.net/volume/. Retrieved June 29, 2017 .

Effects of Music-elicited Emotion and Its Effect on Anterior Frontal Eeg
WILL J. ORTMAN
BETHEL COLLEGE (KS) DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Sponsored by: DWIGHT KREHBIEL (krehbiel@bethelks.edu)
ABSTRACT
This study examined the effect of classical music on anterior frontal asymmetry. Electroencephalogram (EEG) activity was recorded from the left frontal cortex (F3) and the right frontal cortex (F4) from 17 subjects, during which four different classical choral works (two of which were considered `approach` or positive works, while the other two were considered `withdrawal` works) were played. Pre-test baseline as well as post-approach condition baseline and post-withdrawal condition baseline samples were taken. Alpha band (8-13 Hz) power was extracted using a Fast Fourier Transform, and the means were analyzed. ANOVA analysis indicated significant effects of condition on both the left frontal (F3) and right frontal (F4) sites; however there was not a significant effect of condition on asymmetry (F4 minus F3). Significant differences were found between the baseline (non-music) conditions and the music conditions. Participants` degree of music background and prior familiarity with the pieces was also shown to have a significant effect on frontal activation.

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Submitted 5/21/99 3:16:00 PM
Last Edited 5/21/99 3:51:45 PM
Converted to New Site 03/09/2009

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