Is Alcohol a Gateway Drug?
Sponsored by Missouri Western State University Sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation DUE-97-51113
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The proper APA Style reference for this manuscript is:
PETTY, M. O. & MYERS, A. J. (2004). Is Alcohol a Gateway Drug?. National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse, 7. Available online at http://www.webclearinghouse.net/volume/. Retrieved November 23, 2017 .

Is Alcohol a Gateway Drug?
MARION O.T. PETTY III & ALYSSA MYERS
MISSOURI WESTERN DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Sponsored by: Brian Cronk (cronk@missouriwestern.edu)
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to find if there is a connection between alcohol use and marijuana use. The common knowledge that many people believe is that marijuana is a gateway drug. The authors hypothesized that the more alcohol a person has consumed the more likely they will want to smoke marijuana. There were three groups with 15 to 18 subjects in each group. The groups consisted of a control, moderate, and high alcohol groups. Subjects were told a cover story and given alcohol according to their body weight and gender. The subjects were randomly assigned to each group. We had some people that were not in the study be confderates. The Confederates offered fake marijuana to each of the three groups, and the confederates kept count of those that smoked the marijuana cigarettes. Subjects were debriefed and asked to complete a survey about their past and present drug use. The results that the authors found were statistically significant. Researchers found that the more alcohol consumed the more likely the sujects were to try marijuana. All of the subjects reporting use of marijuana also reported alcohol use.

INTRODUCTION


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REFERENCES

Submitted 4/27/2004 12:41:04 PM
Last Edited 4/28/2004 10:57:25 AM
Converted to New Site 03/09/2009

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